Eleaf Lexicon Kit | Review

Welcome to the light show.

11 min read

Eleaf Lexicon Kit Review

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Eleaf has been a little more adventurous with their designs recently. We’ve already seen the Tessera and iStick Pico S go down a different path. Now we have a full-on LED light show with the Lexicon kit.

The Lexicon has been designed with futuristic elements in mind and is decorated with intersecting lights. It’s powered by dual 18650 batteries and can fire up to 235 watts.

It comes paired with the ELLO Duro subtank which utilizes the HW-N (Net) and HW-M (Multihole) coils.

The Good

Excellent build quality, configurable LEDs, good wattage performance, good subtank & decent mesh coils.

The Bad

Small screen, lacking power curves and not the greatest at TC.

The Bottom Line

The Lexicon Kit is a solid choice if you like LED lights on your mods. It has excellent build quality, decent power performance and uses the impressive ELLO coils. However, there are still better dual 18650 kits on the market.

7.8

Disclosure: This product was sent to us by Eleaf for the purpose of this review.

Specs

  • Size: 45 x 31 x 132.5mm (6.5ml version)
  • Liquid Capacity: 6.5ml (or 2ml TPD)
  • Battery Type: Dual 18650s
  • Output Wattage: 235W max
  • Output Voltage: 0.5V-8V
  • Resistance Range: 0.05 -3.0 Ohms (VW mode)
  • 0.05 -1.5 Ohm (TC-Ni/Ti/SS/M1/M2/M3 mode)
  • Colors: Red, Black, Silver, Dazzling, Blue, Purple

In the Box

  • 1 x Lexicon (without cell)
  • 1 x ELLO Duro Atomizer (6.5ml or 2ml)
  • 1 x HW-N 0.2ohm Head
  • 1 x HW-M 0.15ohm Head
  • 1 x QC USB Cable
  • 2 x User Manuals
  • 1 x Set of Spare Parts
Design7.5
Eleaf Lexicon Kit Review

There’s no getting away from manufactures pushing different types of LED configurations on mods at present.

Thankfully Eleaf has managed to keep the Lexicon looking remarkably simple and sleek; the LEDs are well implemented and actually suit the style of the device, giving it a sort of futuristic Tron-esque look.

The rather small screen is located in a slightly unorthodox place at the top right-hand side of the mod to allow space for the ‘flux capacitor’ style front facing lights. The +/- adjustment buttons are triangular slithers that sit nicely beneath those lights, accompanied by the micro USB port.

The fire button also features some lights of its own, with two of the same flux capacitor style shapes glowing in the center of a large diamond shaped plastic button.

LEDs and lights aside, the Lexicon is a dual 18650 device capable of outputting 235W and features a centered 510 connection. It can only house 26mm atomizers with no overhang, due to the top face of the mod being considerably narrower than the device itself.

Although it is quite a bulky box mod, the rounded edges and cut-off corners do soften the look and make it more comfortable in the hand. The chassis of the Lexicon is made from zinc alloy; it has a really nice brushed metal look took it. It also has a coating which feels like some kind of lacquer, that should help protect from knocks and scratches.

However, the finish on the silver version we have is a bit of a fingerprint magnet. I’m not sure if this will be the case with all the other colors.

The Lexicon is available in Silver, Blue, Red, Black Dazzling, and Purple.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Style

When I first laid eyes on the Lexicon, it was hard to look past the overabundant LED strips.

It was evident that the only real selling point of this device over other Eleaf mods was going to be the lights. However, after a few days of using the Lexicon, I began to appreciate its form and finish. It is a very sturdy and comfortable mod to use, even if it is a bit on the bulky side.

I still wouldn’t go out of my way to seek this mod out over dual 18650 devices based on style, but I can certainly appreciate that Eleaf has done a very good job at making it look unique and futuristic.

I’m sure plenty of vapers are going to love its appearance.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Build Quality

The build quality of the Eleaf Lexicon is very impressive.

The battery door is the typical push out and slide doors, that we see on lots of dual battery mods. It feels really solid once batteries are installed, and there are absolutely no rattles. There are battery orientation markings inside the door.

It fire button doesn’t have any rattle either, and although it is made from plastic, it actually feels quite solid and is very clicky. The same can be said of the +/- adjustment buttons.

The quality of the display is fine, and it get’s bright enough. But I would’ve like to have seen Eleaf step it up a notch or two with the screen size, as it’s just far too small.

The 510 pin is gold-plated and spring-loaded, with a decent amount of travel so that most atomizers will sit perfectly flush with the device.

As I mentioned above the finish of the Lexicon is incredibly smooth to touch, and it’s coated paintwork will certainly hold up well against the knocks and scratches.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Portability

The Lexicon measures in at 81mm x 31mm x 45 mm, which puts it in the mid to upper size category of dual-battery mods.

The robust zinc alloy frame also gives it a little weight, as it comes in at around 228grams.

So one the whole it’s not the smallest or lightest dual 18650 mod, but it’s certainly not too big or uncomfortable to carry around.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Innovation

Unfortunately, there’s not much innovation with the Lexicon by Eleaf. They are just simply following other manufacturers with the LED craze.

However, they have managed to create a somewhat novel way of using those LEDs and a unique looking device to go with it.

Features7.5
Eleaf Lexicon Kit

The Lexicon comes with all of the typical Eleaf features.

There’s temp control for SS, Ni, Ti, and three TCR memory modes in addition to a bypass mode.

There’s also preheat options, allowing you to enter the power and duration of the preheat in wattage mode.

The screen displays all of the critical information like current wattage, coil resistance, voltage and amps when firing, along with an indicator for each battery.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Operating

I’m not the biggest fan of Eleaf’s new icons and menu system for their simple screen devices, but they are relatively intuitive to use.

Navigation:

  • 5 clicks of the fire button for on or off
  • 3 clicks of the fire button to access the modes (Variable Wattage, Bypass & Temp Control
  • options: Ni, SS,TI,M1,M2,M3)
  • Hold fire button and + for the Menu Options
  • Hold + & – buttons to lock/unlock (does not lock fire button)
  • While in TC mode click fire button 4 times to adjust wattage

Menu Options & Icons:

  • The resistance icon – (only visible when in TC mode) lock or unlock resistance.
  • The squares & diamond icon – choose display info; Puff Count, Vape Time or Amps
  • The man icon – stealth on or off
  • The 3 wavy lines icon – (only visible in wattage mode) preheat settings for wattage mode.
  • Lightbulb icon – choose LED colors or disable
  • The V icon – hardware and firmware version
  • The battery icon – current voltage in the battery
Eleaf Lexicon Kit

LED LIghts

The LEDs can be configured via the settings menu.

You have the ability to set the color, and length of time that the lights display. The colors available are Red, Orange, Yellow, Blue, Green, Cyan, and Purple.

There are also three different modes that you can set for the pattern of the lights, with different pulses or signals.

Alternatively, If you don’t like LEDs then you can switch them off, but then I’m not why you’d choose to buy this device and not use the LEDs.

The Tank7.5
Eleaf Lexicon Kit

We’ve seen and reviewed the Ello Dura tank before on the Eleaf iJust 3 Kit.

It comes in two variants with a 6.5ml capacity bubble glass or a TPD/EU version with only a 2ml capacity.

There are 3 large airflow holes on the base which are adjusted with the very knurly AFC ring.

The Dura features a slide to fill port and comes with two mesh coils at 0.15 and 0.2 ohms.

However, Eleaf seems to have taken a step backward with the quality of the Dura tank. We had no issue with the one on that came with the iJust 3, but this one seems to have quite a loose top fill.

Eleaf has also decided to include some strange white swirly markings not only on the 810 drip tip, but also along the glass tank itself. It just kills the look of the tank for me and doesn’t really match the Lexicon mod.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Refilling

One thing we don’t have on this version of the Dura tank is the slightly annoying membrane in the fill port that we’d seen on previous variants. So that’s a good thing.

However, as mentioned above the slide to fill mechanism, feels a lot looser on this version of the tank. Now that could just be a quality control thing with our tank, which may even be a pre-release kit.

I’m sure, knowing Eleaf that won’t be the case with all kits, but we have to review what we have in front of us.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Coils

The Ello Duro has 2 different mesh coils available.

However, Eleaf refers to them as either a net coil (HW-N) or multihole coil (HW-M).

The HW-N (net coil) is 0.2-ohm, and the HW-M (multihole coil) is 0.15-ohm in resistance. Both are made from Kanthal although disappointingly there’s no indication of this either on the coil itself or in any of the packaging.

The HW-N has the finer course mesh amongst the two and does heat a little faster than the HW-M.

The Ello Dura is also compatible with any of Eleaf’s Ello coil range along with being compatible with Smok’s baby beast coils.

Performance8.0
Eleaf Lexicon Kit

The performance of the Lexicon did surprise me a little.

There’s the usual reliable wattage experience you’d expect from an Eleaf device.

However, it was with temp control that I had a far greater experience than expected based on my previous failings with TC on Eleaf devices.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Wattage Mode

The Lexicon isn’t the fastest at firing, but it’s no slouch and fires fast enough in wattage mode. It also seems very accurate on the power.

I didn’t venture up into the +200W ranges, but I’m sure with a low ohm coil it would manage it just fine.

I tested all of the pre-heat settings, and they do seem to make a noticeable difference. However, I still would like to see Eleaf implement full power curve adjustments in their firmware.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Temperature Control Mode

My usual experience with TC on an Eleaf device is one of frustration, as it tends to jump out of TC when using exotic coils.

I’m not sure if I was just luck or whether Eleaf has addressed some issues here, but the Lexicon stayed in TC mode all the time while I was testing.

It also seemed a far smoother experience than I remember from other recent Eleaf devices, but that could just be my mind playing tricks on me.

Don’t get me wrong it still isn’t the greatest when it comes to TC, and if you only vape that way, there are far better chipsets available.

But it does seem like a step in the right direction from Eleaf in my testing.

Eleaf Lexicon Kit

Battery Life

As a dual 18650 device, you’d expect the battery life to be good, and it is. I’d say it’s comparable to other dual 18650 mods.

However, the LED strips do affect battery life. If you leave the LEDs always on, the batteries do drain faster. It’s not vast amounts but its definitely noticeable compared to if you have the lights off altogether.

There’s also 2-amp charging if you need a quick top-up, although as always we recommend charging batteries out of the device.

Likes

  • Excellent build quality
  • Large fire button
  • Good power performance
  • Centered 510
  • Good performance from tank
  • Solid battery door
  • Lots of available colors
  • Excellent range of coils

Dislikes

  • Small screen
  • ‘Always on’ LEDs can drain battery
  • Not the greatest TC performance

Verdict

I don’t really get this craze of plastering mods with LED lights, but I will say the Lexicon is probably the classiest looking device yet that features a light show.

The build quality of the device is excellent, and the Ello Dura tank is an above average sub tank that uses very impressive coils.

However, there are some things I’d love to see changed on the Lexicon like a larger screen, and Eleaf is still lacking when it comes to power curve features and TC performance.

That being said, if you like the flashing devices and primarily stick to wattage mode, then I think you’ll enjoy using the Lexicon kit by Eleaf.

REVIEW OVERVIEW
Design
7.5
Features
7.5
Tank
7.5
Performance
8.0
Cost
8.5
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Jules is our vaping font of knowledge. He has been a passionate vaping supporter since 2013 and spends his time trying to educate people with ‘facts’ on the safety and benefits of vaping.